How to assemble your helmet like a pro.

Minute

Concept
So you want to assemble your helmet like a pro eh? Well, you'll have to settle for me.

Lets begin.

These are the tools you're going to need:
-Dremel: I recommend the 4300 with flex shaft attachment.
-Super glue+activator
-Primer, I recommend dupli-color perfect match scratch filler primer. Sprays on super fine.
-Dremel bits
-Screwdriver
-BREATHING MASK!!! DONT KILL YOURSELF OVER FETT
-A space to work, I like to do my sanding outside to prevent any dust build up.
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First step, what I like to do first is sand any excess around the bottom lip of the helmet, this is best done first as doing so after cutting out the visor can lead to cracks in the mandibles. You can use 40-80 grit sand paper or an orbital sander(what I use) to flatten it out.

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Next. Drill the holes on the platforms, for the larger hole you should use a sanding drum bit to cut it out. Using this will leave a very clean cut out as opposed to using a steel drill bit like what was using for cutting the smaller holes.


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(Look at that perfect cutout of the larger hole!)

BORDEN.
For this, I like to use the larger diamond bit. Start by dremeling with the bit at around 30 degrees in the center of the borden, until you make a hole, then widen it until the borden is removed. Should you decide to dremel straight down, you risk the dremel slipping and hitting the cheek.

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KEYSLOTS!

Yaaaay the bane of your existence, well, time to make it easy for you. Many of you use files for cutting them out, which is very time consuming and so very tedious. NOT TODAY!

What I like to do, is use the sanding drum dremel nit, and sand from the inside. Using this method, I cut out the key slots in several minutes and always have perfect key slots with zero damage from accidentally sanding too much using a file.

This is a very tricky method to master. You'll want to take your time with this part to prevent any mishaps.
Start by locating all six cutouts, and sand from the middle, then do the sides. What you're aiming to do it sand to the point where there is only a very thin layer left, see this picture for reference. By doing so, you can then flip the helmet over and poke out the key slots with ease. Easy right?
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(Here you can see the faint outline of the key slots, this is what you're aiming for)

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(Pictured, helmet from the outside, I poked the key slots out with a sanding file, if done correctly, they'll pop off just fine)

VISOR
Now the part that many people tend to do a bit sloppy, the visor cut out! If you've never done this, I recommend taping up the mandibles with a couple layers of painters tape to prevent any damage from the cutting wheel. Cut out the visor following this diagram, leaving a couple millimeters of space between the mandibles to again, prevent any accidental slips.IMG_4641.JPG
(Remember, this may seem sloppy to leave so much excess but It will be taken care of in the next steps)

After cutting out the visor, your flex shaft will come into play, using the flex shaft with the drum wheel attachment sand the interior to thin out the visor area so that it can sit flush and tight. You'll want to be careful doing this as too much sanding can make those mandibles too thin.
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(The flex shaft is a lot thinner and can get into tight places, perfect for sanding the interior. If you don't have a flex shaft, some 60-80 grit sand paper will work, but will be time consuming)

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(Pictured here, the mandibles are currently too thick, you want to sand them down bit more)

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(This is the desired thickness for the mandibles)


Update:
Attaching the visor clips. This is where the super glue comes in. No putty involved at this step, that will come next.
You will want to place the visor inside the helmet while installing the clips so you position them correctly. Position them too far and it won't hold the visor in place correctly.

Sand the areas lightly where you will be placing the clips, then put some super glue on the helmet, and the accelerator on the underside of the metal clip. You will only have a few seconds before the glue hardens, so place them around the same areas I placed mine. The glue is done before the putty, as you'll want two methods of securing the clips to prevent them from falling off in the future.
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How it currently sits:
IMG_4658.jpg
Hooray! This is where you are now! You can now attach your ears and visor using your preferred method of attachment.
Several methods of attaching the visor are: super glue+accelerator, hot glue, Chicago screws)


Update 2:
PUTTY(ESB SPECIFIC)

So the following pics show how you should apply the putty. Please take note, that in two of the pics there is some red lines, you should also put putty in those areas as well, making a rectangular shape on the upper cheeks. You will see that there is a small amount of putty on the other side of the left upper cheek, this is because im sure the rectangular cut out on the other side was sculpted onto the original 6 helmets individually.

NOTE(do not attempt to recreate how I put the putty, I did not recreate it 100% as there aren't good pics of the interior, so just use mine as a basis for where to put your putty)
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Stay tuned..
Im currently working on assembling the helmet pictured so this will be updated as I progress with the helmet. Next parts will be, attaching the visor, putty, interior paint, etc.

For future updates, I will attach the visor using accurate methods, and demonstrate how to attach the mq1 to the key slots. Along with installing the topper in an accurate fashion.
 
Last edited:

rubio95

Admin
Staff member
Excellent tutorial!

When I started out, I was using a ton of pilot holes and jeweler's files to clear out the key slots. Yeah, THAT was time...spent.

What would be REALLY nice is a place to purchase a set of the interior clips in one package!
 
Thanks Luis! As I was telling him the other day, I ordered my very first bucket from him almost two years ago and literally had to send him the question "ummm, how do I cut out the visor area?". Proud to say I've come a long way, thanks in large part to his answering of my questions. I'm still scared about that key slot method though! :)
 

intwenothor

Moderator
Staff member
Nice! The internal keyslot sanding is one of the best efficiencies out there. I use a mini belt sander from Black and Decker, but the effect is the same. Takes minutes! I think Ryan Day or D. Woelfel pointed me the way in that one.

Edit: it was Ryan.

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Last edited:

ShortFuse

BFB Hero
Thanks Luis! As I was telling him the other day, I ordered my very first bucket from him almost two years ago and literally had to send him the question "ummm, how do I cut out the visor area?". Proud to say I've come a long way, thanks in large part to his answering of my questions. I'm still scared about that key slot method though! :)
It all started with one helmet and then he never looked back. :p
 

Minute

Concept
Nice! The internal keyslot sanding is one of the best efficiencies out there. I use a mini belt sander from Black and Decker, but the effect is the same. Takes minutes! I think Ryan Day or D. Woelfel pointed me the way in that one.

Edit: it was Ryan.
Agreed, the keyslots are something I see a lot of people mess up. Actually, I think MOST people mess up the key slots because of the outdated method of using a sanding file. Happy to bring tips like this to the community.
 
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